Review: Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast

Publisher Description:

You can feel Castle Bloodghast seething around you.

This ancient castle is the grave of many a hero. When a fearful angel appears to him in a vision, Gideon is charged to enter the cursed fortress in search of his childhood friend. But demons are the least of the denizens lurking in the heart of the castle. Gideon must battle the fruits of the most depraved genius as he struggles to reach his old comrade.

Abominations lurk in every shadow, and the worst atrocities are those committed by bloody human hands. Will Gideon put the corrupted experiments to the torch as they rampage out of control? Will he find a way to escape the curse and free his friend? Or will he break under the unrelenting horror at the heart of the fortress?

Enter Castle Bloodghast, where even angels fear to tread.

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Review: Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast by Adam Lane Smith

Here at the Periapsis Press blog, we only post reviews of works we recommend, so you already know I enjoyed Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast. I encourage you to check it out!

This review contains minor spoilers.

Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast is a heavy metal Christian campaign to bring a lost lamb out of a stronghold of evil and back to the fold. This fourth installment of the Deus Vult Wastelanders series continues to deliver hard-hitting action.

Chilling Setting

This time, Gideon Ira spends less time traversing the apocalypse-ravaged countryside and dives straight into a shiver-inducing dungeon crawl.

Castle Bloodghast provides a more structured feel to the pace of this story, alternating detailed battles with monsters and suspenseful exploration of dark laboratories. The juxtaposition of mad science and the deeper malevolent character of the castle itself gives the story a layered tension. This made it difficult to predict the sorts of evil the characters would have to face as they proceeded towards their goal.

Straight-forward Action

One of the unique attributes of the Deus Vult Wastelanders series is the stark nature of the story. No matter where you open the story to, something exciting will be happening, and there are no great complexities of character, plot, or theme, that detract from the entertainment value of the simple action.

Gideon Ira, for example, although confronted by demons with guilt and temptation, is in no great danger of submitting to them. He is a model knight of strong character. His companions are stalwart and true.

Furthermore, he was charged with his task by God, making it impossible that he should fail, as long as he remains faithful, which is under no doubt. In fact, the greatest uncertainty is how the characters will be able to prevail as they continue to rack up the injuries.

But we didn’t come to read about Gideon struggling to do the right thing. We get enough of that in our own spiritual life. We came to experience the righteous battle and undeniable victory of the Lord in glorious, bloody action!

Theme

The theme is, therefore, impossible to miss. Christianity is not tucked neatly under the surface to take the reader by surprise or present itself only when looked for. There are numerous confessions of faith and two conversions, both of which emphasize that anyone is redeemable by God.

The one that is central to the plot, Gideon’s childhood friend, is actively participating in the evil plaguing the region and is even possessed by a demon. He does not desire God, but God uses Gideon to confront him and change his heart.

Catholicism

It should be noted, that this book is very Catholic. Obviously, Catholics will not take issue with this, but what about a Baptist girl like me?

Adam Lane Smith is diplomatic, but as with all elements of the story, the religion is worn on the sleeve. However, the prayers and confessions, most of the theology in fact, are universal Christian beliefs. Nothing to violate the conscience of a firm Protestant.

Check It Out!

Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast is a great addition to the Deus Vult Wastelanders series. Although it is technically the fourth, each story stands well on its own, making it easy to jump in at any point!

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Review: Gideon Ira: Knight of the Blood Cross

Publisher Description:

Demons and Necromancers haunt a burnt and blasted future in the ruins of what was once America.

A holy crusader sworn to slaughter the dark cults of Ba’al the Ever-Hungry must rescue a band of innocent children with his blade and blood-soaked gauntlets, or die trying.

All of Hell thirsts for his blood, but a man of God will never be broken. This holy crusader’s vengeance will be brutal.

The first book in a new heavy metal Christian pulp series.

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Review: Gideon Ira: Knight of the Blood Cross by Adam Lane Smith

This review was written by Ben Espen and originally appeared on his blog With Both Hands on January 9, 2020. Periapsis Press is sharing it with permission. I encourage you to check out his website!

This review contains minor spoilers.

Gideon Ira reminds me of Solomon Kane, if he had a repeating firearm and power armor. This assessment of Solomon could easily be written of Gideon:

A hunger in his soul drove him on and on, and urge to right all wrongs, protect all weaker things, avenge all crimes against right and justice. Wayward and restless as the wind, he was consistent in only one respect–he was true to his ideals of justice and right. Such was Solomon Kane.

Gideon Ira: Knight of the Blood Cross is a post-apocalyptic adventure that will leave no demon unscathed.

Unlike Solomon, Gideon does not need to restlessly wander the Earth looking for evil men to ease of their lives. There is an abundance of such, and far worse, close to home, and Gideon finds his purpose in defending his home from the horrors that roam the world.

Not Gideon, but a brother in spirit

NOT GIDEON, BUT A BROTHER IN SPIRIT

We don’t know exactly what happened to the world. Since it has been several centuries since the world was “torn”, perhaps true knowledge of that event has passed from living memory. In my imagination, it was something like the precipitating event of the Doom series, a scientific investigation pushed far beyond the bounds of reason and sense in the pursuit of pure power.

However, the same civilization that presumably brought the world to ruin also left behind artifacts of great power that have been pressed into service by the defenders of humanity. Hence, Gideon and his brother Knights have the ability to not only combat wicked men, but also the foul demons and other hellspawn that were unleashed in the now legendary cataclysm.

And Gideon does this in abundance. In the opening chapter, Gideon does battle with a Pride demon, three times the height of a man and covered in insect-like armor. Later he massacres leathery flying monsters and animated skeletons by the dozens. Unfortunately, as natives of Hell, these things cannot truly be killed, only inconveniently discorporated.

A key difference in the world of Doom and Gideon’s world is that ordinary people are able to live out their lives, protected not only by Gideon’s fierceness, but also by holy places and holy signs. The unclean things cannot abide a cross, or the touch of a sacramental like holy water. Thus life can in some respects go on, for those who seek the protection of the Church.

While there are some fascinating hints that the devil-worshipers who live in the blasted wastelands and the faithful protected by careful maintenance of blessed objects are locked in a kind of economic interdependence, this is primarily an adventure novel, and not hard sci-fi or fantasy with rivets. Thus, we get a quick line that the flying transports the Knights use are fueled by demon blood, and a deduction that the population of the demon-haunted regions could only be sustained by defection and fed by theft, since they neither toil nor spin.

However, the real meat of the novel consists not in the derring-do of Gideon, but in the Solzhenitsyn like realization that the real border between good and evil lies not in the boundary formation made with crosses and blessed paint, but within each man’s heart. In a world where demons roam the Earth, and holy water and crosses repel them, you might be tempted to think that the petty arguments we have about religion would fall by the wayside.

In a way, that is correct, insofar as the Catholic Church dominates Gideon’s world. However, it doesn’t really change the fundamental relationship of men to truth, or the way that temptation works. What has changed is that in cases where you might suspect demonic influence, it is now overt rather than covert. The demons just shout the things that they might have previously whispered to you in a dream. In our world, dark conspiracy theories claim that worshiping the devil is a means to worldly power. In Gideon’s world, you really do get magical powers from kneeling before the demons, and all the fun that comes from seeing your enemies driven before you, and hearing the lamentations of their women.

On the other hand, we have very real evidence of the power of God. Those demons fear holy things, and are burned by the sacramental holy water that priests can produce in nearly unlimited quantities as long as they have a source to draw from. In a curious reversal to the unlife of the hellspawn, an embodied demon can steal your life by force, but not your soul. The demons must rely on the old-fashioned methods to do that.

Thus, faith, hope, and charity are critical virtues to maintain in Gideon’s world, just as much in ours. Gideon himself, as stalwart as he is, primarily draws his strength from the theological virtues. For that, plus a fun, finely crafted story, I can heartily recommend this for anyone who likes pulp adventure.

If you enjoyed this guest review, please check out http://www.benespen.com/

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Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast Crowdfund

Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast Crowdfund

The third novel in Adam Lane Smith's heavy metal Christian series Gideon Ira begins its Kickstarter Campaign.

On July 16th, Adam Lane Smith announced his Kickstarter for Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast. This book will be the third in the Gideon Ira series and the fourth in the overarching Deus Vult Wastelanders series.

It broke through the initial funding goal within 5 hours, and Smith has already released the first stretch goal, with more fun to come if that is also met.

Adam announced at the same time that Ivan Tao would be returning as the cover artist, and Brian Niemeier as the editor for the series.

On the campaign page, Smith says,

“Crusaders in power armor invade an ancient evil castle. This heavy metal Christian gothic horror novel will melt your face right off.”

This campaign ends August 14th.

Check out our positive, long-form review of Adam Lane Smith's Ghostblade!

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Review: Ghostblade

Publisher Description:

Giant monsters roam the land. 

Civilization is frozen in a savage age. For one young hunter named Alden, power and survival are one and the same. The ancient evil that once ravaged his village and murdered his ancestors has returned. At the same time, politics hurls Alden into gladiator pit battles for control of the throne.

When Alden takes possession of a cursed sword promising untold power, the hunter is determined to save his people by slaying every giant monster standing between him and the throne. But the angry ghost trapped inside the blade has other ideas.

The first entry in a thrilling LitRPG light novel series!

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Review: Ghostblade by Adam Lane Smith

Here on the Periapsis Project, we only post reviews of works we recommend, so you already know I enjoyed Ghostblade. I encourage you to check it out!

Ghostblade is an adventure-packed light novel in the shōnen vein that delivers a unique and entertaining spin on some of the best elements of that genre: tenacious characters, dynamic action sequences, and thematic elements of diligence and community. Beautifully illustrated by Ashion. This compelling first installment of Adam Lane Smith’s The Savage Hunters series has certainly whetted my appetite for more!

This review contains minor spoilers.

Earnest Protagonist

Alden is a virtuous main character with a desire for self-improvement, grounded in a strong sense of community. While this is a common character trope in the genre, Smith’s execution, particularly in tying Alden’s character development to a stronger thematic message about what it means to be a man, lends Alden a more mature tone than is typical among shōnen leads.

I found myself rapidly gaining a respect for the young hero. He aspires to become a better hunter in order to protect his village, and it is clear that the needed growth is in experience and not in repentance or common sense. This avoids some of the cringy scenes typical of young protagonists. Alden might make poor decisions, but they were always from a pure motivation that I sympathized with, never from internal flaws or faults inflated for cheap character improvement down the line.

As a result, Alden comes across as a lifelike character, and it is easy to believe that his peers respect and trust him in a leadership position.

Vivid Action

This light novel is chalk full of captivating action sequences. Each conflict is vividly described, with all the involved characters taking active roles against the monsters that they face. Even in the gladiator-style tournament, the battles did not run together monotonously. They were all fresh, through different beasts, tactics, and characters.

Alden’s fights, in particular are always multi-faceted. They incorporate conflict on multiple levels, from the basic struggle for survival in the arena, to the political competition for the throne, to the over-arching clash of order and chaos.

Unfortunately, the complex nature of these conflicts can make the handful of scenes starring other teams and their battles a bit tedious. Although this, too, is a common element of shōnen-style tournaments, I have always found them to drag on a bit too long. Smith successfully hooked me into his story; I was invested in Alden’s team and their objectives. That made it hard for me to find interest in the battles of the other characters. Take that with a grain of salt, however, because I am not a sports fan in real life, either: I never could see the appeal in March Madness, for example.

Gameplay-based System

I enjoyed Smith’s choice to incorporate an RPG-based levels system into his world. I thought the LitRPG concept was well executed and worked beyond the simplistic “give the reader a quick understanding of everyone’s relative power.”

Not only did the clear levels give a sense of objectivity to the character’s abilities, but they also emphasized their need to improve if they wanted to be able to protect their community. In this way, they raised the stakes from the very beginning. Balanced against the character development as they were– particularly Alden’s diligence and desire for self-improvement – meant that, even though the hunters’ levels were not high, I believed they had the moxie to succeed.

Furthermore, the skill trees inserted an additional sense of hope, particularly to the over-arching conflict against the ancient threat, by offering the characters opportunities of growth tailored to combat it. They might not be ready for that just yet, but it offers a tantalizing promise of more epic action to come!

Setting Put to Work

Ghostblade has a very polished feel to the whole work, with a clear attention to detail from plot and character to grammar and word-flow. The setting is no exception here.

Often a story’s setting, particularly in fantasy genres, is more a consequence of plot or an exercise in artistic description than a functional aspect. While I can’t claim to know if Smith intended to put his setting to work in the service of storytelling, it certainly came out that way.

The story has three major settings: the village, the corrupted forest, and the city.

The Village – Order and Vigilance

The early descriptions of the village and surrounding terrain convey nobility in simplicity and hard work. Here is the first glimpse we are given of Alden’s home:

“The front door made of dense, woven wool opened onto a dirt floor and a large rectangular hall.”

This seems relatively straight-forward, and yet it is representative of a consistent picture Smith creates of this setting. Handicraft permeates the scene, from the woven front door to the bone structure of the house itself. Things may be simple, from the dirt floor to the open space, but there is a strong connection between the people who live there, even though none are present in that first scene. Someone made the door, someone – ancestors no longer even living – built the house. A strong sense of heritage exists – a legacy of hard work manifested in every item in Alden’s home.

This generates a sense of belonging, further emphasized by the oversized dinner table and the meal set aside for Alden, and contributes to a feeling of security. This village is a safe place, with a strong wall and competent hunters standing watch. So safe, in fact, that none of the buildings have actual doors.

Not only does this accentuate Alden’s character as we are first introduced to him, but it also sets up the major conflict of the series: the return of the Scourge that nearly drove the village to extinction. The community’s safe and connected lifestyle contrasts sharply with the corrosive and invasive nature of the enemy.

The Forest – Chaos

“Looming skeletal trees seemed to reach for the band from the corner of Alden’s eye. Every so often, the abrupt cawing of a raven would tear through the forest, and the hunters would jerk in their saddles.”

The second setting further emphasizes the dichotomy between order and chaos. Where the village represented the safety, security, and happiness possible within order (particularly demonstrated by the wedding), the forest embodies the constant strife, fear, and loss of self that is perpetuated by chaos.

Alden and his friends must be constantly on guard because the Scourge is not only physically corrosive and viscerally repugnant, but also threatens them on a spiritual level: “The Scourge already burned in Jincra’s flesh and spirit to a degree which terrified Alden.” While it is yet unclear exactly how this spiritual aspect might manifest (assuming the physical corrosion was halted), it is easy to imagine how it could jeopardize the relational security within the community.

Note: I think it is fair to categorize this conflict as order vs chaos, at least in this first installment in the series, rather than the typical good vs evil. Although the characters interpret the corruption as having a malicious intent towards them, I do not see it depicted in this story as having a particular direction to its consumption. It seems more like an invasive sickness that must be driven out before it reaches a vital organ, as it eventually would if left to its own devices.

The City – Laxity

The third setting, Ceralahn City, stands in contrast to the village in a different way. While the village was a safe and secure place, it was not so by chance. The community was constantly vigilant, posting lookouts against outside threats and intentionally working to pass on their traditions and beliefs to the next generation – safeguarding against a different kind of chaos.

However, the city, on the other hand, is not a place characterized by simplicity and a tight-knit community. Smith never faults the city for this, necessarily. There is no a commentary on rural vs metropolitan. Rather, the city seems to represent a society distracted by various affairs. Its people reject the threat of an outside evil, preferring instead to believe their own events, such as the political tournament, are the driving force of all motivations. The people are divided into their own tribes and factions; therefore, the city lacks any sense of unity, even in something as simple as clothing, which is always richly described. Furthermore, the ending (without going into detail) reveals that they are blind to the chaos unfolding within their own walls.

Even Alden and his team must constantly remind one another that their true purpose is not necessarily to win glory and political power through the tournament, but to gain allies against the true threat that they face.

Smith’s skillful composition of setting puts it to work for the story in both plot and thematic avenues. I know I’ve spent a lot of words here, but it was a treat for me to discover such a uniquely integrated setting!

Check it Out!

Ghostblade is a brilliantly entertaining adventure, with compelling characters, vivid action, and subtle setting all in service to an engaging story. Accessible whether you are familiar with light novels or not.

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