Review: Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast

Publisher Description:

You can feel Castle Bloodghast seething around you.

This ancient castle is the grave of many a hero. When a fearful angel appears to him in a vision, Gideon is charged to enter the cursed fortress in search of his childhood friend. But demons are the least of the denizens lurking in the heart of the castle. Gideon must battle the fruits of the most depraved genius as he struggles to reach his old comrade.

Abominations lurk in every shadow, and the worst atrocities are those committed by bloody human hands. Will Gideon put the corrupted experiments to the torch as they rampage out of control? Will he find a way to escape the curse and free his friend? Or will he break under the unrelenting horror at the heart of the fortress?

Enter Castle Bloodghast, where even angels fear to tread.

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Review: Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast by Adam Lane Smith

Here at the Periapsis Press blog, we only post reviews of works we recommend, so you already know I enjoyed Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast. I encourage you to check it out!

This review contains minor spoilers.

Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast is a heavy metal Christian campaign to bring a lost lamb out of a stronghold of evil and back to the fold. This fourth installment of the Deus Vult Wastelanders series continues to deliver hard-hitting action.

Chilling Setting

This time, Gideon Ira spends less time traversing the apocalypse-ravaged countryside and dives straight into a shiver-inducing dungeon crawl.

Castle Bloodghast provides a more structured feel to the pace of this story, alternating detailed battles with monsters and suspenseful exploration of dark laboratories. The juxtaposition of mad science and the deeper malevolent character of the castle itself gives the story a layered tension. This made it difficult to predict the sorts of evil the characters would have to face as they proceeded towards their goal.

Straight-forward Action

One of the unique attributes of the Deus Vult Wastelanders series is the stark nature of the story. No matter where you open the story to, something exciting will be happening, and there are no great complexities of character, plot, or theme, that detract from the entertainment value of the simple action.

Gideon Ira, for example, although confronted by demons with guilt and temptation, is in no great danger of submitting to them. He is a model knight of strong character. His companions are stalwart and true.

Furthermore, he was charged with his task by God, making it impossible that he should fail, as long as he remains faithful, which is under no doubt. In fact, the greatest uncertainty is how the characters will be able to prevail as they continue to rack up the injuries.

But we didn’t come to read about Gideon struggling to do the right thing. We get enough of that in our own spiritual life. We came to experience the righteous battle and undeniable victory of the Lord in glorious, bloody action!

Theme

The theme is, therefore, impossible to miss. Christianity is not tucked neatly under the surface to take the reader by surprise or present itself only when looked for. There are numerous confessions of faith and two conversions, both of which emphasize that anyone is redeemable by God.

The one that is central to the plot, Gideon’s childhood friend, is actively participating in the evil plaguing the region and is even possessed by a demon. He does not desire God, but God uses Gideon to confront him and change his heart.

Catholicism

It should be noted, that this book is very Catholic. Obviously, Catholics will not take issue with this, but what about a Baptist girl like me?

Adam Lane Smith is diplomatic, but as with all elements of the story, the religion is worn on the sleeve. However, the prayers and confessions, most of the theology in fact, are universal Christian beliefs. Nothing to violate the conscience of a firm Protestant.

Check It Out!

Gideon Ira in Castle Bloodghast is a great addition to the Deus Vult Wastelanders series. Although it is technically the fourth, each story stands well on its own, making it easy to jump in at any point!

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Review: Gideon Ira: Knight of the Blood Cross

Publisher Description:

Demons and Necromancers haunt a burnt and blasted future in the ruins of what was once America.

A holy crusader sworn to slaughter the dark cults of Ba’al the Ever-Hungry must rescue a band of innocent children with his blade and blood-soaked gauntlets, or die trying.

All of Hell thirsts for his blood, but a man of God will never be broken. This holy crusader’s vengeance will be brutal.

The first book in a new heavy metal Christian pulp series.

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Review: Gideon Ira: Knight of the Blood Cross by Adam Lane Smith

This review was written by Ben Espen and originally appeared on his blog With Both Hands on January 9, 2020. Periapsis Press is sharing it with permission. I encourage you to check out his website!

This review contains minor spoilers.

Gideon Ira reminds me of Solomon Kane, if he had a repeating firearm and power armor. This assessment of Solomon could easily be written of Gideon:

A hunger in his soul drove him on and on, and urge to right all wrongs, protect all weaker things, avenge all crimes against right and justice. Wayward and restless as the wind, he was consistent in only one respect–he was true to his ideals of justice and right. Such was Solomon Kane.

Gideon Ira: Knight of the Blood Cross is a post-apocalyptic adventure that will leave no demon unscathed.

Unlike Solomon, Gideon does not need to restlessly wander the Earth looking for evil men to ease of their lives. There is an abundance of such, and far worse, close to home, and Gideon finds his purpose in defending his home from the horrors that roam the world.

Not Gideon, but a brother in spirit

NOT GIDEON, BUT A BROTHER IN SPIRIT

We don’t know exactly what happened to the world. Since it has been several centuries since the world was “torn”, perhaps true knowledge of that event has passed from living memory. In my imagination, it was something like the precipitating event of the Doom series, a scientific investigation pushed far beyond the bounds of reason and sense in the pursuit of pure power.

However, the same civilization that presumably brought the world to ruin also left behind artifacts of great power that have been pressed into service by the defenders of humanity. Hence, Gideon and his brother Knights have the ability to not only combat wicked men, but also the foul demons and other hellspawn that were unleashed in the now legendary cataclysm.

And Gideon does this in abundance. In the opening chapter, Gideon does battle with a Pride demon, three times the height of a man and covered in insect-like armor. Later he massacres leathery flying monsters and animated skeletons by the dozens. Unfortunately, as natives of Hell, these things cannot truly be killed, only inconveniently discorporated.

A key difference in the world of Doom and Gideon’s world is that ordinary people are able to live out their lives, protected not only by Gideon’s fierceness, but also by holy places and holy signs. The unclean things cannot abide a cross, or the touch of a sacramental like holy water. Thus life can in some respects go on, for those who seek the protection of the Church.

While there are some fascinating hints that the devil-worshipers who live in the blasted wastelands and the faithful protected by careful maintenance of blessed objects are locked in a kind of economic interdependence, this is primarily an adventure novel, and not hard sci-fi or fantasy with rivets. Thus, we get a quick line that the flying transports the Knights use are fueled by demon blood, and a deduction that the population of the demon-haunted regions could only be sustained by defection and fed by theft, since they neither toil nor spin.

However, the real meat of the novel consists not in the derring-do of Gideon, but in the Solzhenitsyn like realization that the real border between good and evil lies not in the boundary formation made with crosses and blessed paint, but within each man’s heart. In a world where demons roam the Earth, and holy water and crosses repel them, you might be tempted to think that the petty arguments we have about religion would fall by the wayside.

In a way, that is correct, insofar as the Catholic Church dominates Gideon’s world. However, it doesn’t really change the fundamental relationship of men to truth, or the way that temptation works. What has changed is that in cases where you might suspect demonic influence, it is now overt rather than covert. The demons just shout the things that they might have previously whispered to you in a dream. In our world, dark conspiracy theories claim that worshiping the devil is a means to worldly power. In Gideon’s world, you really do get magical powers from kneeling before the demons, and all the fun that comes from seeing your enemies driven before you, and hearing the lamentations of their women.

On the other hand, we have very real evidence of the power of God. Those demons fear holy things, and are burned by the sacramental holy water that priests can produce in nearly unlimited quantities as long as they have a source to draw from. In a curious reversal to the unlife of the hellspawn, an embodied demon can steal your life by force, but not your soul. The demons must rely on the old-fashioned methods to do that.

Thus, faith, hope, and charity are critical virtues to maintain in Gideon’s world, just as much in ours. Gideon himself, as stalwart as he is, primarily draws his strength from the theological virtues. For that, plus a fun, finely crafted story, I can heartily recommend this for anyone who likes pulp adventure.

If you enjoyed this guest review, please check out http://www.benespen.com/

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Review: How Black the Sky

Publisher Description:

Pierce – a brash young man with rare blessings of strength and really bad news.

Axebourne – the fatherly berserker with infectious laughter.

Scythia – calm and motherly, her Circlet of Knowing reveals secrets.

Agrathor – a mighty spearman with an electric personality
and a terrible skin condition.

Ess – Second only to the First Great Master of Convergent
Reality Theory. Pierce thinks she’s hot.

They are Gorgonbane. Once mercenaries, now heroes, they are the only thing standing between Overland and the horrid Monstrosities of the Underlord. His lust for power has reached its peak, but the coming invasion may not be exactly what it seems…

The world of Chasmgard is a place with endless secrets and a strange cosmology.
A deep red sun crawls across a canvas of black, and nobody remembers why. Landlocked by a depthless Chasm, Overland and the Underlands have always vied for power and land.

In How Black the Sky, we join a band of legendary warriors who may just be at the end of an age.

Multiverse Books

Each novel and short story in the Multiverse comes with a map and basic world statistics for use in roleplaying and other non-commercial gaming scenarios. We have included only basic stats that should be adjustable for any use you have!

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Review: How Black the Sky by T. J. Marquis

Here at the Periapsis Press blog, we only post reviews of works we recommend, so you already know I enjoyed How Black the Sky. I encourage you to check it out!

How Black the Sky is a fun, heavy metal romp following a band of warriors through epic battles to defend against an invasion of Underworld monsters! The action-driven plot underscores a refreshing, brawlier representation of Christianity than is typically seen in fiction. This story serves as the first in the Hero’s Metal series.

This review contains minor spoilers.

Heavy Metal Action

Heavy metal is not merely a genre label for this novel. According to his forward, T. J. Marquis intentionally designed his characters around the members of a heavy metal band and drew thematic inspiration from progressive metal.

This certainly comes through in the intense action sequences, which describe not only the efforts of the team, but also focus on the skill of an individual (like a solo) and how they interact with the others in friendly competition, pushing forward the power of the band as a whole.

As a result, the battles are driving and densely choreographed—an entertaining combination of brute force and complex skill, cool people doing cool things. Moreover, the imagery is reminiscent of a heavy metal concert, with grandiose settings, cool weapons, and showmanship.

Post-History Fantasy Setting

The mechanics of Chasmgard are unique and interesting. They certainly go beyond the typical fantasy / post-apocalyptic setting and are deeper than a mere color change for the sky. Underland is not merely beneath Overland—it isn’t underground—but is layered. Underland has its own sky, with a moon that moves across it, and yet it still maintains a physical orientation, below Overland.

Overland itself has a post-history flavor. There are ruins and legends (for example, the sky wasn’t always black, but was once blue) that hint that the world wasn’t always in its present state.

I shy away from the term post-apocalyptic only because it isn’t yet clear that it was a catastrophic event that caused this and the term tends to be applied to settings that are or were the real world. While the latter could be a possibility, this first book makes no explanations, for even the characters themselves do not fully understand their world’s history nor the particularities of how it works. 

The result is a tantalizing mystery for later works in the series.

Plucky Pierce

Pierce, the main protagonist, was my favorite character. While significantly younger than the original members of the Gorgonbane group, he holds his own in both bravery and skill in battle. However, his humility, positive attitude, and inquisitiveness make him fun to follow in the story. I hope to see more of him in future stories.

Pierce serves as a vehicle for the audience to learn about the other characters, since he is the new guy in the group. If Gorgonbane is a band, then Pierce is a fan who has stumbled into a dream-come-true opportunity to work with them. His interactions and the stories that they tell him develop the audience’s knowledge of these established heroes.

This first Hero’s Metal novel does spend a lot of time on this, but as all of the characters are, as I mentioned, cool people doing cool things, I found the stories of valor forgivable since they are entertaining. One weakness that does result is the lack of tension due to half of the tale occurring in retrospect and the other half shaded with the suspicion that these awesome characters will likely survive to the next book.

The Glorious Paths

A most thought-provoking element of How Black the Sky is the Overlander’s religion The Glorious Paths. This is a uniquely executed reflection of Christianity, and I found it intriguing how it put forward a different aspect of God’s character in this depiction than commonly seen by depicting Him as “the Blacksmith.”

While most Christian fiction emphasizes the attribute of love (sometimes to the detriment of all other characteristics), Marquis’s Blacksmith, while loving, is unavoidably sovereign.

In the Great Sanctuary stands a sculpture of the Blacksmith, and on his anvil humanity is being forged: “Their legs were elongated into a tapered shape like the blade of a longsword, and the woman’s arm was stretched out to one side in a partial crossguard.” Everything, including the fighting and conflict, occurs at the Blacksmith’s will to “temper” his servants and prepare them to walk the Glorious Path.

This process is not necessarily pleasant. The people on the anvil grit their teeth, grunt, and scream. But the Blacksmith has a vision for them beyond the immediate process. The Overlander’s God is not only fully in control, he is also intentionally working to prepare them for a purpose beyond this life. His followers are “the weapons that would one day slay Oblivion itself.”

Pierce in particular wonders if he will be deemed fit to serve after “this time of shaping and testing.” I appreciate how this portrayal imparts the biblical beliefs that God’s ways are not our ways and this present life is merely a shadow of what is to come.

The idea of salvation is not touched on in this book, and the morality is rather hazy, but I look forward to seeing how these ideas develop as the series progresses!

Check It Out!

How Black the Sky is an enjoyable adventure full of hardcore action, valiant warriors, and thought-provoking themes. A great start to the Hero’s Metal series!

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